Skip to content

Columns & Blogs

Preventing Corporate Intimidation of Rightsholders

Unfavorable news, a negative opinion of an opinion leader, or even an unfounded rumor can affect companies whose value depends to a large extent on the confidence of their shareholders and the public in their good behavior and the possibilities of obtaining profits by investing in them.
Read more
Comedia

Nanette, the end of stand-up?

I was struck by her message and her innovative and thoughtful way of thinking about comedy.
Read more

“Terms and Conditions May Apply”… depending on where you are

In practice, the Latin American lack of adequate protection manifests itself in the possibility of banks using credit algorithms to decide whether to grant a loan or not, without any intervention by someone with the authority and competence to change the decision.
Read more

The New Routinization of Inhumanity: Small Acts of Staggering Consequence

Perhaps it’s time to state firmly, and insistently, that we see everyone who let themselves be swooped up in machines of inhumanity, and not just the masterminds. And perhaps it’s not too late to call out enough of the small bureaucrats and agents so that they, too, squirm, question and upend the pact of purposeful obtuseness that is required to carry on with systems of oppression designed to harm from a safe distance.
Read more

Taxes on soft drinks in the Americas: trend or necessity

More than a trend, the increasing number of countries implementing a tax on soft drinks shows that this kind of fiscal measure is a cost-efficient policy to tackle the obesity epidemic in the Americas.
Read more

The justice needs of the world

States need to know the legal needs of their populations and the ways in which citizens act to manage and resolve those needs in order to design better schemes for the resolution of disputes and for providing access to justice.
Read more
Global Rights Blog

Going Beyond Nature

What does granting rights to nature really mean? How can the rights of nature be materialized? Which rights? Where does this recognition leave the communities that have traditionally inhabited and helped to conserve certain areas?
Read more

Juan Pedro Lares: The freed prisoner that never was

Juan Pedro Lares, a 24-year old Colombian-Venezuelan young man, who was abducted by a hundred civilian-dressed members of the Venezuelan Intelligence, the National Guard, the police, and armed civilian groups from his family’s home in July of last year was finally set free . But a feeling of injustice still lingers.
Read more
CRG_Columna_Helicoide

Venezuela in a spiral

El Helicoide gets its name from the geometric shape of the building that houses the prison, which resembles a spiral. The crisis in the prison and the elections this Sunday could worsen the spiral of Maduro’s regime towards arbitrariness.
Read more

A cure to end homicides

Examples from initiatives across Mexico, Colombia and South Africa shed some light on policies that could help reduce the homicide rate across the Global South. Inclusive and holistic policies that include a wide range of societal actors may offer remedies to tackle this crisis.
Read more

Indigenous Sovereignty and the Wars on Drugs in the Americas

As drug policy reform takes on new meaning and energy across the hemisphere, let us also remember the historic indigenous effort to retain sovereignty over territory and sustain communities, now challenged by both drugs and the wars against them.
Read more

The needles revolution: reducing damages while protecting the health of drug users

Offering new needles to drug users - no matter how controversial it could be - is increasingly urgent in order to protect the health and rights of these populations.
Read more
Powered by swapps
Scroll To Top