Photo: Sonny Abesamis

Between ‘el Perdón’ and ‘el Paredón’: International Standards and Transitional processes in Colombia

Catalina Botero Marino | June 17, 2005

This chapter gives a detailed recount of international jurisprudence and the limitations that it imposes, as well as the possibilities it offers to the countries in transition.

 

This chapter gives a detailed recount of international jurisprudence and the limitations that it imposes, as well as the possibilities it offers to the countries in transition.  Countries such as Colombia are faced with the need to negotiate peace agreements with groups that have committed serious human rights violations.  This chapter pays special attention to the normative and constitutional framework that applies specifically to Colombia’s situation and the ways in which it is complemented and governed.  The document describes and analyzes the content and the scope of obligations that the state has in relation to rights of justice, truth and victim reparation for violations of human rights and international humanitarian rights (these rights are called the principle of Joinet) to guarantee that no repetition of serious violations of human rights occurs.  It concludes with a description of the mechanisms or ways of protection that is at the disposal of the victims of serious violations of human rights and of international humanitarian rights to guarantee the rights in a domestic and international environment.

The electronic copy of this book is not available.


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