Skip to content
Column

Madurazo

There were no tanks attacking the civil institutions, which characterized previous coups. But in Venezuela there was a coup d’état, which intends to be judicially legalized, but that nevertheless is a democratic rupture.

Read More
Column

Money and democracy

The revelations of these weeks showed that the campaigns of Santos 2010 and Zuluaga 2014 received concealed funding from Odebrecht, which allowed them to violate the electoral caps.

Read More
Column

Sunflowers and tricks

In 2010, presidential campaign year, candidate Antanas Mockus designed his political proposal based on simple ideas like these: “not everything is fair game” and “public life and resources are sacred.”

Read More
Column

Trump and the future of human rights

Donald Trump’s presidency creates serious risks and challenges for human rights globally, but this victory could have an unexpected positive effect: to push the human rights movement to carry out transformations in its architecture and changes in its strategy that were imperative even before Trump, and that are now urgent.

Read More
Column

The bubble that Trump popped

It is time to
escape the bubble that popped with Trump’s victory. It would be more comforting
to think that millions of voters were tricked by a professional of contraption,
as it was less painful for many to conclude that the results of Bexit or the
Colombian plebiscite on peace were just tricks of the winning campaign so that
people voted with anger.  
  

Read More
Column

We need more, not less democracy

Many have criticized the government’s decision to call a plebiscite on October 2nd. Popular ratification was not judicially necessary. Even some, like Montealegre or Ferrajoli, claim that it was judicially questionable. For these reasons, several, including the president, have suggested that eventually, a new accord should not be subject to a popular referendum. 

Read More
Post

The Bullying Continues

Based on all the criticism the Inspector General´s Office received (including from those who did not support Petro), some of us thought, mistakenly, that the Inspector General would calm down.

Read More
Post

The Ecuadorean Miracle?

With Venezuela and Argentina in trouble, many look to Ecuador in search of a inspiring model for the Left. The first impression is encouraging. Upon arriving at Quito’s superb airport you get a sense of the Correa government’s investment in infrastructure that extends into two-lane roads from the door to the Amazon in Puyo.

Read More
Post

Discomfort and Democracy

Marches, road blocks and protests may create discomfort in some sectors. But attempts to suppress them may end up asphyxiating democracy. Even for those who defend social mobilizations, these protests can become uncomfortable.

Read More
Post

Democracy without Participation?

It is foolish, the result of an elitist and antiquated view, to think of social protests as a deficiency. On the contrary, it is the best sign that the excluded sector feels they have a voice to participate politically and express their disagreements.

Read More
Post

More on Petro’s Removal from Office

There is an crucial legal issue in Petro’s removal from office that has hardly been discussed. It is the following issue: Even if you accept that the Inspector General has the power to remove a mayor, it would have to be done through a rigorous and demanding process, that was not carried out in Petro’s case.

Read More
Post

The Year of Hope for Peace

For those of us who were born in the 80’s, hope is almost an unknown feeling. We know that it is like an abstract idea, since we hear it from the mouth of leaders who fought against the violence. But back then the idea was not only never put in practice, it was also used to aggressively repress those who dared proclaim it.

Read More
Powered by swapps
Scroll To Top