Posts Tagged ‘Derechos fundamentales’

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10 reasons why drug policy needs to be shaken up

The growing risks of the war on drugs can no longer be ignored. On June 26, organizations from around the world will come together under the slogan “Support. Do not punish.” In Colombia a special event will be held in Medellín this Friday 23.

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How to Change the Box “Sex” on Your Documents: Infographic

Dejusticia, alongside other organizations, intervened before the Court in the case of a trans woman who saw her rights to identity and dignitiy violated by the state not allowing her to change her sex on official documents.

 

The Constitutional Court ruled in her favor, and the ruling served as a precedent for the Decree 1227 that now allows people to change their sex on official ocuments through a notarized deed.

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Coalition Report UN Resolution 1325 on Peace and Democracy in Colombia

Since 2011, Coalition 1325 has drafted a report on UN Security Council´s Resolution 1325 monitoring the implementation of the Resolution in Colombia. This year, given the peace dialogues between the Colombian Government and the FARC-EP, this report is especially important because Resolution 1325 calls upon signatory states to include women in peace processes and post conflict scenarios, and to guarantee the rights of the women victims of armed conflict.

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Land Reform in Colombia: One step Forward Two Steps Back

Land reform in Colombia, while politically sensitive, is necessary to stabilize the country and end a violent conflict that has plagued Colombians for more than half a century. Colombia’s internal fighting has deprived millions of their land and livelihood. Adopted in June 2011, Colombia’s Victims and Land Restitution Law, also known as Law 1448, is an important advance in providing restitution for those displaced by the conflict.

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The Missing Persons of the Palace of Justice and the IACHR

It is contradictory for the Government to accept responsibility before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (ICHR) for two of the disappearances at the Palace of Justice and for the torture of two of the detainees, but then try to minimize its responsibility with regard to the other nine missing persons or the execution of Clerk Urán, by saying that what happened was a merely a governmental failure, but not a disappearance or execution.

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